Virtual reality will dominate this CES. The focus primarily will be on the introduction of wireless, high end VR headsets. Eyes are fixed on the transition from Samsung Gear VR to VR devices like the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.

4 Wireless headsets: a step backward for VR and a safety concern

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5 Wireless headsets: a step backward for VR and a safety concern

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It is said that wireless headsets will boost VR, which provides free and unlimited walk in the real world while connected to the virtual world. Recently, two major advancements have alerted everyone. TPCast, from the HTC Vive, has created tetherless headsets that is available on sale for Chinese customers for just over $200.

6 Wireless headsets: a step backward for VR and a safety concern

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Similarly, at the same time, Oculus Rift unveiled its wireless prototype named Santa Cruz, which gives you extreme VR experiences without limiting you around the pc.

7 Wireless headsets: a step backward for VR and a safety concern

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So enjoying the boom, expectations are high for the upcoming CES, where various companies can surprise us with their wireless VR headsets.

However, critics still consider the wireless improvement as something insufficient or maybe harmful, owing to the VR experiences on the Vive, Rift, PlayStation VR and Google Cardboard. VR wireless headsets require a capacious and very comfortable environment that should allow you walk around while you being fully immersed in the virtual world.

There must be something that should alert you before you stumble due to VR-guided movements. Most people might not have such arrangements. No matter what, it is indeed one of the most dangerous things you cannot altogether ignore.

In the tech world, stories exist of the knee or toe banging or any other manual or material loss that makes it a real threat for those who want to enjoy this ride no matter what it takes.

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A lot of stories have been shared by VR communities across the internet, who are even tethered, with only three to five feet away from our PC boxes. Now imagine when one is fully ‘wireless’ in a high-end VR experience.

However, both the Vive and Rift have virtual guidance boundaries (called Chaperone and Guardian, respectively), but often used both in room environments. These boundaries are relative, based on sensor tracking, that indicates one still has to be conscious. On the other hand, if you use a front-facing camera that enables you to see into the real world, like in Vivo, the momentous experience of virtual reality gets damaged.

The matter of concern is that not every technology serves the best or the safe of human experience. It must be considered that how is something safe, convenient and user friendly.

Tetherless, high-end VR should also be put to questions. So unless one is seated in a swivel chair, as most of the public spaces are not, it’s difficult to conclude that wireless VR headsets  would be safe and practical in such environments.

8 Wireless headsets: a step backward for VR and a safety concern

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