Overwatch is probably the first game in which we genuinely noticed this overgrowing loot crates culture but unlike Star Wars Battlefront II and Middle-earth: Shadow of War, this game wasn’t criticized at all for including this modern form of gambling. The game’s Director, Jeff Kaplan has talked to PCGamesN and has explained why the critiques couldn’t pick up this game for their debate:

There were a couple of core philosophies that were very important to the team when creating our loot box system. One was that it had to be a very player-centric system. As players ourselves we don’t want any sort of power increase in our system. We wanted the system to be purely cosmetic, so that was one of the core philosophies.

The second was that we wanted every item that was available in the loot boxes to be obtainable in some way that didn’t have anything to do with luck, so we [compensated players for duplicates], and di the credit system, and the unlocks. That way, if you ever felt like ‘There was that Junkrat skin that I’ve always really wanted but I don’t seem to ever pull it out of the loot box’, that you had an avenue of obtaining that that wasn’t loot box driven, or random driven.

 

Kaplan wants the fans to listen to this:

The other reason that our loot box system has been successful so far is we try to listen to our players as much as possible. They’re very vocal when they’re unhappy about things. An example is the first Summer Games event, where you couldn’t get the items for credits, and our players said ‘Hey, that’s not cool, we’d really like to get the items for credits.’ So, as soon as that event ended, we added the ability for the next event. Then, shortly after the Anniversary event, we made it so that duplicates were far rarer in the loot boxes. I can never say that duplicates don’t exist, because we don’t have infinite content, so at some point a duplicate will exist. But we were hearing feedback during the Anniversary event like ‘Hey, these duplicates aren’t really cool, what can you do about it,’ and we made a change.

So, we’re hoping to show players that we play the game too: we’re involved in a dialogue with them, we’re happy to make changes, the system’s cosmetic-only, and you can obtain everything in the loot boxes through other ways. That’s what’s stayed important to us.

In addition to what Kaplan has said, one can also see the nature of loot boxes that are being used in the game. If you compare its loot boxes with those of other games, these ones seem to be rightly placed where no one can raise a question on them. They go smoothly with the nature of the game and that’s probably the biggest reason, Overwatch isn’t receiving that much criticism.

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