A couple of weeks ago Samsung at long last clarified what brought about the Galaxy Note 7 flames and explosions that killed the acclaimed phablet not long after it began selling in stores. In any case, the organization never said what it wanted to do with the colossal heap of fresh and briefly utilized Galaxy Note 7 units that it gathered from everywhere throughout the world when it reviewed the failed telephone. Unsubstantiated reports said that Korean goliath may seriously mull over reselling a renovated Galaxy Note 7 after it settles whatever brought about the batteries to burst into flames. Presently, a new rumor out of Asia claims a similar thing, possibly uncovering more insights about Samsung’s aims.

galaxy note 7 1200x801 It appears that Samsungs Galaxy Note 7 is making a comeback
via: forbes.com

As indicated by Hankyung, Samsung will supplant the first 3,500 mAh battery with either a 3,000 mAh or a 3,200 mAh battery. The renovated Galaxy Note 7 units will then be sold in specific markets, including India and Vietnam. Samsung has recouped 98% of the more than 3 million Galaxy Note 7 units it transported around the world, however the organization is yet to make any declarations with respect to the fate of the phablet.

The report doesn’t specify genuine pricing data for the repaired phablet, yet it says that Samsung plans to relaunch the smartphone by June. It’s not clear now whether the phone will be accessible in any of the markets outside of India and Vietnam.

maxresdefault 42 It appears that Samsungs Galaxy Note 7 is making a comeback
via: youtube.com

In any case, Samsung still has a noteworthy issue staring it in the face. The organization needs to figure out how to discard the extensive number of Galaxy Note 7 batteries it’s been gathering and putting away for the past months, and the whole procedure must be environmentally friendly. Reselling a restored variant of the telephone to customers may be a good move, yet those old batteries should still be discarded.

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